Project

Our National Parks are vulnerable to climate change in a number of ways, requiring changes in the way we manage our parks.  This project uses decision support tools (e.g., scenario planning, vulnerability assessments) and climate science to help park managers adapt their management practices to climate change. Park managers are asking what changes they can expect that uniquely affect their park and to what degree.  With this information, they can use Scenario Planning and other decision support tools to consider new management strategies or modifications to existing strategies that help the park face these climatic changes.  Other parks need to first identify which of their assets (e.g., natural resources, infrastructure, etc) are vulnerable to climate change, in which case they also need to know how the climate is changing unique to their park in order to conduct a climate change vulnerability assessment

Project

Striped bass are a priority species for the Northeast LCC.  Subadult and small adult (375–475 mm total length) striped bass Morone saxatilis are abundant in northern estuaries during the spring through late fall.  However, little is known about how this important marine fish migrate among estuaries and use salt marshes as foraging areas.  This project assesses the migratory pathways of striped bass and is developing a quantitative understanding of diet and habitat use. Both of these aspects are critical for managing this valuable marine fishery resource.Young striped bass were captured in July - Sept. in primary tidal creek channels, tagged weighed, and measured.  Stomach contents indicated they were feeding predomanately on marsh dependednt prey (shrimp, mummichogs).  Tissue samples were preserved for RNA estaimtes of growth rates.   We have shown that striped bass show hot spots of abundance in estuarine areas

Project

This project compiled, synthesized, and communicated tailored climate change information to NE CASC stakeholders, including Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC), state and federal agencies, and tribal communities. Our mission is to make climate science actionable by getting to know our stakeholders and the decisions they face, and delivering climate information that is directly relevant to their decisions and priorities. Our project team served as a resource to answer individual inquiries related to climate model projections in order to aid climate change adaptation. Additionally, our team contributed to the development of a synthesis document to help the Midwest and Northeast states prepare their threatened wildlife for climate change through their State Wildlife Action Plans (SWAPs)

Image
Hemlock Forest; Public Domain
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