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The University of Massachusetts Amherst

Wintering Birds in Intensively Established Pine Plantations of Coastal Plain Mississippi

Authors:

Brice Hanberry

Phillip Hanberry

Samuel Riffell

Stephen Demarais

Jeanne Jones

Publication Type:
Journal Article
Year of Publication:
2013
Secondary Title:
Southern Journal of Applied Forestry
ISSN:
01484419
DOI:
10.5849/sjaf.11-028
Pages:
91-96
Volume:
37
Year:
2013
Date:
05/2013

Abstract

Intensively established pine plantations are an important component of the southeastern US landscape. Because only minimal information exists about how current establishment practices affect wintering birds in managed forests, we documented effects of five pine plantation establishment practices that varied in intensity on wintering birds during years 1 through 5 postestablishment in the Coastal Plain of Mississippi. Using mixed general linear models, we compared species richness, total bird abundance, and individual species abundance. During the first 5 years, species richness and total abundance were greatest in the chemical-only establishment practice, whereas species richness and total abundance were lower in mechanical site preparation establishments with increasingly intensive chemical herbaceous controls. For five common species with treatment effects, abundance generally was greatest in the chemical-only establishment practice and abundance decreased as establishment intensity increased. Increasing stand establishment intensity in mechanical-prepared treatments generally reduced presence of wintering avian species in young pine plantations of the Lower Coastal Plain. Conversely, tree and snag retention facilitated by chemical-only site preparation may enrich avian assemblages in intensively established pine plantations.