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The University of Massachusetts Amherst

Chapter 15 : Tribal and Indigenous Communities. Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States: The Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume II

Authors:

Lesley Jantarasami

Rachael Novak

Roberto Delgado

Christopher Narducci

Elizabeth Marino

Shannon McNeeley

Julie Raymond-Yakoubian

Loretta Singletary

Kyle Whyte

Publication Type:
Journal Article
Year of Publication:
2018
Publisher:
U.S. Global Change Research Program
DOI:
10.7930/NCA4.2018.CH15
Year:
2018
Date:
Nov-23-2018
URL:
https://nca2018.globalchange.gov/chapter/15/

Abstract

Indigenous peoples' histories and shared experience engender distinct knowledge about climate change impacts and strategies for adaptation. Indigenous peoples' traditional knowledge systems can play a role in advancing understanding of climate change and in developing more comprehensive climate adaptation strategies.

Climate impacts to lands, waters, foods, and other plant and animal species threaten cultural heritage sites and practices that sustain intra- and intergenerational relationships built on sharing traditional knowledges, food, and ceremonial or cultural objects. Challenges to Indigenous actions to address disaster management and recovery, displacement, and relocation in the face of climate change include economic, social, political, and legal considerations that severely constrain their abilities to respond to rapid ecological shifts and complicate action toward safe and self-determined futures for these communities.